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The Hedrick Lab seeks to better understand the interconnected relationship between morphology, phylogeny, and ecology in order to answer the question:

How do morphological innovations lead to ecological expansion and the radiation of taxa?

By studying a wide variety of taxa ranging from sharks, to bats, to rodents, to dinosaurs, we assess the impact of morphological evolution on the great diversity of life, past, present, and future.

News from 2022

May 26, 2022: New Papers Out with Undergraduate First Authors

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We published two papers with undergraduate first authors partnered with the Brennan lab at Mount Holyoke College on watersnake genital shape, copulatory fit, and sexual selection. One was led by Juliet Greenwood (https://doi.org/10.1093/icb/icac020) by Genesis Lara Granados (https://doi.org/10.1093/biolinnean/blac051)Congrats guys!

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Tanner Frank (now a PhD student at UC Berkeley) just published his undergraduate thesis on the form and function of the avian pelvis in the Journal of Morphology (https://doi.org/10.1002/jmor.21479). Wonderful to get this one out!

April 3, 2022: Bat House Building Workshop and Turtle Fieldwork!

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The Hedrick Lab led a bat house building workshop partnered with the Louisiana Master Naturalists. We built 11 boxes and distributed them to attendees hopefully giving some Louisiana bats a nice new home! (left)

Additionally, we started a new field conservation project centered on musk turtles and urbanization. We got our first turtles last night so the project is underway! (right)

January 10, 2022: Hedrick Lab at SICB

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Erin Sheehy and Kara Abazajian presented their undergraduate research projects at the annual Society of Integrative and Comparative Biology conference in Phoenix. Erin is currently working on writing up her research for publication and Kara is collecting more data. They did a wonderful job representing their work and the Hedrick lab!